2017 Presentations

Keynote Speakers

Keynote I: Completion Reconsidered: The Future of Student Success in a World of Disruptive Innovation

Dr. Michael A. Baston, President of Rockland Community College

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Dr. Michael A. Baston, President of Rockland Community College in New York will address the new realities facing higher education and their influence on institutional viability in his keynote presentation.  The student experience is a series of interactions between the student and the college. Students will either gain or lose momentum toward completion in part based on the interactions they have with the institution in light of its policies, practices, programs and processes. Student completion will become more influenced however by how the future of work is changing. Business and industry are increasingly integrating artificial intelligence as part of the calculus of conducting their operations. Disruptive innovation is also playing a major influence on how we live, work, and play. For community colleges to succeed we must be prepared for sustainable change that produces positive outcomes for students and the communities they will live and work in.

 

Keynote II: Gone Away with Tinkering: Redesigning for Guided Pathways

Dr. Evelyn Waiwaiole, Executive Director of the Center for Community College Student Engagement at The University of Texas at Austin (UT)

 

In today’s community colleges, leaders, faculty, and staff, all want to define and masterfully implement student success agendas that will raise retention rates and increase completion rates.  Knowing that tinkering won’t get the job done, colleges are redesigning the student experience with a guided path in mind–to ensure that students have clear direction and understand the pathway to reach their goal.  It takes more than starting a piloting, or right-sizing a pilot that has been in existence–it’s about asking the question, are we a student ready college?

 

Keynote III: The Story Behind the Numbers: A Focus on Data, Accountability, and Leadership in Higher Education

Madeline Pumareiga, Chancellor of The Florida College System

 

This address will highlight key principles associated with successful college leadership as it relates to increased student engagement for the 21st century. Specific emphasis will be given on leadership fundamentals, guided pathways and the student success agenda, and an understanding of the challenges and opportunities leaders will face in the coming decade based upon a data driven culture and technological advances.

 

Keynote IIII:  Bringing it all Together

Dr. Sanford “Sandy” Shugart, President of Valencia College

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The past several years have produced a remarkable burst of innovation in community colleges seeking to improve student outcomes.  Many of the promising practices are featured at conferences such as Moving the Needle and are being tested and implemented across the country at a growing number of colleges.  While positive results can be seen from a new toolkit of interventions and practices, they have yet to deliver the quantum-level improvements across the college student population we serve. This presentation suggests that the challenge is in putting it all together, that is, moving the whole college toward concerted, sustained, scaled efforts to improve outcomes.  This requires implementation of new practices, but within a framework of strategy and on the basis of a deep change in culture.  How do we engage the whole college in the agenda, cheerfully?  Five major themes for moving the college’s strategy and culture forward will be explored.

 

 

Concurrent Sessions

Session 1-1: How Broward College Leveraged Digital Channels to Re-vamp Their Onboarding Experience

Help Students Choose and Enter a Pathway

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Presenters:
Trimeka Benjamin, President
Swim Digital Group
Bryan Anderson, District Director
Broward College

 

This session explores how Broward College redesigned their recruiting and student onboarding experience with the use of digital resources and the deployment of a CRM. In this session, you will hear all of the highlights of successes and lessons learned as Broward College mapped the prospective student experience and internal processes, and prepared their CRM.

 

Session 1-2: A Measured Exploration into Campus Event Attendance and Student Success

Keep Students on Path

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Presenters:
Theresa Dimmer, Institutional Research & Reporting Coordinator
St. Petersburg College
Frank Jurkovic, Student Life & Leadership Coordinator
St. Petersburg College
Dr. Christy Powers, Chair, Legal Studies
St. Petersburg College

 

This is a workshop with discussions about how SPC uses student data and event attendance. We will explore student demographics, course data and performance (retention and course success) with comparisons to event attendance using our Business Intelligence Platform (SPC Pulse).

 

Session 1-3: Great Career Explorations: Choosing Your Destiny

Help Students Choose and Enter a Pathway

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Presenters:
Brooke Janik, Career and Academic Advisor
St. Petersburg College
Kelliann Ganoo, Career and Academic Advisor
St. Petersburg College

 

An advisor and student’s guide to the career exploration process. An interactive session with attendees delving deeper into the career conversation. Navigating through the process of career coding, career planning, and a sneak peek of the career resources readily available to students and advisors.

 

Session 1-5: Becoming a Pathways College: Lessons Learned at Front Range

General Pathway Resources

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Presentation hand-out

 

Presenters:
Cathy Pellish, Vice President
Front Range Community College
Chico Garcia, Director of Online Student Success
Front Range Community College
Laura Sherrik, Psychology Faculty, Department Chair for Social and Behavioral Sciences
Front Range Community College

 

Front Range Community College embarked on a journey to become a student-ready college with a singular focus on student success over two years ago. Our efforts drew on national models such as Completion by Design and Achieving the Dream, the AACC Pathways Initiative, visits to leading community colleges, key literature reviews as well as previous work on student success at the College. In this interactive panel discussion, FRCC team members will share lessons learned in building a case for change based on both local and national data. Additionally, we will share how we used the Eight Steps to Transformation (Kotter, 2007) as a guide in supporting a cultural transition to becoming a college focused solely on student success. Please join the FRCC President, Instructional and Student Affairs Leaders, and faculty in this lively discussion on Becoming a Pathways College.

 

Session 2-1: Assessing Your Institutions Readiness for the Guided Pathways Journey

Clarifying the Path

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Presenters:
Margaret Bowman, Director, Curriculum Services
St. Petersburg College
Dr. Teri Trede, Faculty in Charge, Health Services Administration Program
St. Petersburg College

 

This interactive workshop introduces participants to SPC’s approach to developing and implementing Guided Pathways. Emphasis is placed on how to engage faculty, administrators, and other stakeholders in focused conversations about redesigning curriculum to support Guided Pathways.  Participants will assess their institutions’ readiness for the Guided Pathway journey and identify the current ‘health’ of their curriculum using key performance indicators.  Participants will experience the confusion and frustration students feel when navigating through an “overgrown” college curriculum, but will leave with a framework and set of tools to “clear the path” to student success.

 

Session 2-2: How Local College Access Networks Take a Community Approach to Student Persistence

Keep Students on Path

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Presenters:
Kathy McDonald, Assistant Director of Network Partnerships
Florida College Access Network
Jessica Kleinberger, Program Manager for Destination: Graduation
Heart of Florida United Way
Dr. Jan Lloyd, Associate Vice President Student Development
Seminole State College of Florida

 

 

Many of the challenges students face that impact persistence are often non-academic. Colleges and universities throughout Florida are collaborating with community partners through Local College Access Networks (LCANs) to meet complex student needs. These innovative networks follow the collective impact framework to identify barriers that mobilize communities in support of student postsecondary attainment. This session will give you an overview of how LCANs are a different approach to system change that can drive better student outcomes. We will also share a case study of Destination: Graduation, an innovative partnership between the Heart of Florida United Way and Seminole State College, where 2-1-1 case managers aligned with academic advisors to meet the holistic needs of students.

 

Session 2-3: AI – Yes, Data Can Drive Individual Conversations and Results

Keep Students on Path

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Presenter:
Louis Aronson, CEO
Discourse Analytics

 

A recent report by McKinsey just asked the following questions: “It is hardly news that students’ attitudes and beliefs—what we term their “mindsets”—influence their academic performance. But how much?” “Do mindsets matter? If so, to what extent? What teaching practices work best? Does technology help?” We now know that universities, colleges and institutions of higher learning generate and store vast amounts of data, both structured and unstructured. The challenge becomes can you uncover hidden patterns for insight? And, once uncovered can these insights drive recommendations on next best actions. Today, business processes can be transformed by machine learning and artificial intelligence to make it easier for humans to access and act on data driven insights to personalize every service for every individual. Education is no different from other industries like banking where the essential path to success is to put the customer (read student) at the center of the journey. We will explore how to better look at mindsets not only to understand student behavior but drive outcome. The discussion will involve topics ranging from multi-channel engagement to prescriptive analytics and how anonymized “think-alike” clustering can hold remarkable promise for educators and advisors.

 

Session 2-4: Program Learning Outcomes Assessment & Course Content

Ensure Students are Learning

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Presenters:
Dr. Emily Hoeh, Exceptional Student Education Faculty
St. Petersburg College
Dr. Andrea Kelly, Academic Chair and Mathematics Education Faculty
St. Petersburg College

 

The purpose of this presentation is to highlight the link between PLOs (Program Learning Outcomes), MLOs (Major Learning Outcomes) and assessment to inform content delivery and the performance of the program of as a whole. Participants will be able to orally discuss the link between PLOs (industry standards) as it relates to the performance outcomes of students based on the design of course assignments or analysis of course assessments.

 

Session 2-5: Getting Students to Successfully Exit Developmental Education

Ensure Students are Learning

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Presenters:
Dr. Christine Mangino, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs,
Hostos Community College, City University of New York
Dr. Olen Dias, Professor, Mathematics Department,
Hostos Community College, City University of New York
Dr. Jason Buchanan, Assistant Professor, English Department,
Hostos Community College, City University of New York

 

Through five years of assessment and continuous improvement strategies, the faculty at Hostos Community College implemented numerous curricular changes and strategies that have drastically increased the number of students exiting from remediation. The faculty will share their experiences, the strategies and the results through each step of the process. Some results include reducing by more than 50% the number of students who repeat a developmental course while increasing pass rates in developmental classes between ten and thirty percentage points depending on the course. These successes have contributed to more than doubling the three-year graduation rate from 10.3% to 22.1% in four years. Time will be provided for participants to ask questions and to share their best practices and challenges.

 

Session 3-1: Measuring (and Improving) the Impacts of Guided Pathways Reforms

General Pathway Resources

Presentation Link

 

Presenter:
Dr. Davis Jenkins, Senior Research Scholar
Community College Research Center (CCRC), Columbia University

 

The session will show with actual college examples how colleges can measure impacts of their guided pathways reforms using early momentum key performance indicators (KPIs). These early momentum KPIs are useful as they are leading indicators of longer-term outcomes like completion, but they are measurable in one year and show if early gains from reforms are experienced equitably, a prerequisite for equitable longer-term outcomes. Attendees will learn how to run baseline analyses using these KPIs, and hear from practitioners on how they have used the KPIs to drive continuous improvement efforts as their college implemented guided pathways reforms. Presenters will also share a tool for using the KPIs to make simple projections on how increases in the early momentum KPIs could result in increases in completion rates, which can be useful to estimating the range of possible improvements to inform institutional goal setting.

 

Session 3-2: Coaching & Capacity Building for Sustainable Results

Keep Students on Path

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Presenter:
Christine Wiggins, Success Coaching Program Coordinator
Wallace State Community College

 

Over the course of three years, Wallace State Community College built a thriving and sustainable student coaching program resulting in double-digit gains in retention and completion. In this session, learn how senior leaders navigated key decision-making milestone and the considerations to examine when determining what initiatives to launch, which students to target, and how to rally the necessary resources. Attendees will also participate in a change planning workshop designed to apply insights and identify potential pitfalls and opportunities at their own institutions.

 

Session 3-3: Ready, Set, Succeed: Meeting the College Readiness Need

Ensure Students are Learning

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Presenters:
Dr. Jennifer Haber, QEP Faculty Lead and Professor of Communications and Fine Arts
St. Petersburg College
Heather Roberson, Director, CETL
St. Petersburg College
Dr. Carol Weideman, Professor of Mathematics and Statistics
St. Petersburg College

 

The Quality Enhancement Committee used data to identify a greatest need at the institution. Ready, Set, Succeed! is a program that provides students strategies to strengthen their self-efficacy, help them understand how they learn best, and use those strategies to persist and complete their academic goals.

 

Session 3-4: Institutionalizing Open Education Resources (OER) Strategies & Tactics

General Pathway Resources

Presentation Link

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Presenter:
Erik Christensen, Dean, Applied Sciences and Technologies
South Florida State College

 

Adopting OER textbooks can reduce the overall cost of higher education by up to 30% while improving student success through higher grades and increased enrollment/persistence compared to courses taught with traditional textbooks. This presentation provides both strategies and tactics on how to institutionalize the use of OER textbooks at your organization. Come join us and learn how to increase access to higher education by making it more affordable for your students while rekindling your faculty’s passion for teaching.

 

Session 4-1: Redesigning Program Review to Align Academic Programs with Local Workforce Demands

Clarifying the Path

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Presenter:
Dr. Cory Clasemann-Ryan, Assistant Vice President for Student Success
Ivy Tech Community College

 

In 2014 Ivy Tech revamped its program review process in order to review each program (over 600) every year. This made it a much more data-informed process and tied it closely to the college’s annual budgeting process. After the state’s Commission for Higher Education was mandated by the state legislature to conduct its own review of academic programs, additional metrics were added to the process that must be met by all programs – minimum annual enrollment, completion rate, and employment benchmarks. This year we have revised the process further to incorporate job demand projections into the process, which will allow the college to determine which programs require targeted marketing efforts to increased enrollment and meet workforce demand, which ones need to be restructured, and which ones we need to close on certain campuses.

 

Session 4-2: Pedal to the Medal and Academic Success

Keep Students on Path

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Presenters:
Dr. Scott Behrens, Dean of Academic Affairs
Hillsborough Community College
Dr. Nancee Sorenson, President of Brandon Campus
Hillsborough Community College

 

At the end of this presentation, attendees will be armed with a new analytical model, which will allow them to identify “at risk” students before any student steps foot in a classroom. In addition to “at-risk” student identification, attendees will have a blueprint for to target academic deficiencies prior to the start of the semester to move the academic success needle towards retention and completion.

 

Session 4-3: Emerging Student Leaders

Keep Students on Path

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Presenter:
Rochelle Popp-Finch, Coordinator of Student Activities
Indian River State College

 

Being a college student is more than just attending classes. Through the Emerging Leaders Program, we provide students with several opportunities to grow socially, intellectually, and professionally through our partnership with Academic Affairs. Emerging Leaders is designed to help students CONNECT, LEAD, and GET INVOLVED! Studies show that students who were involved on campus are 82% more likely to get a job after graduation; therefore, our program provides a variety of events, seminars, and leaders that will help contribute to student success and beyond graduation when they enter the workforce.

 

Session 4-4: The Pasco-Hernando State College Retention Behavior Inventory (RBI) Program

Keep Students on Path

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Presenter:
Dr. Bob Bade, Vice President of Student Affairs & Enrollment Management
Pasco-Hernando State College
Carly Walters, Coordinator of Retention
Pasco-Hernando State College
Jessica White, Director of Student Activities
Pasco-Hernando State College
Chiquita Henderson, Dean of Student Affairs & Enrollment Management
Pasco-Hernando State College

 

Attendees at this workshop will be part of a watch party and view a live webinar of PHSC’s Retention Behavior Inventory (RBI) call. During the live call, participants will observe how PHSC monitors lead measures, goals and action items related to student retention related behaviors. Following the live 30 minute webinar, facilitators will share lessons learned and how the sessions have evolved over the past two years to best serve students and needs of the College. Attendees will walk away with practical material to replicate this program at their institutions.

 

Session 4-5: Measuring the Impact of Online & F2F Tutoring: Exploring and Applying Empirical Guidance

Ensure Students are Learning

Presentation Link 

 

Presenters:
Matthew Bodie, Executive Director of Learning Resources
St. Petersburg College
Kyra Garofolo, Manager of Program Development
Smarthinking
Dr. Karen Reilly, Campus Dean of Learning Support
Valencia College
Janice Scott, Executive Director of Management Information Services
Pasco-Hernando State College

 

Institutions facilitate student success by offering a wide variety of academic resources and support. Tutoring programs are a popular resource at many institutions, but their usage and effectiveness may vary widely. Both online and face-to-face (F2F) tutoring can serve diverse student populations. This session explores what gains may be achieved through well-implemented tutoring and shares data-driven findings to help higher education faculty and administrators more effectively target students who may benefit the most from access to tutoring support.

 

Session 5-1: Online Orientation: Clearing the Path to Registration and Beyond

Clarifying the Path

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Presenters:
Paola Moneymaker, D.Ed., Executive Director of Student and Academic Services
Eastern Florida State College
Sam Swingle, CEO/Co-Founder
Advantage Design Group

 

What if your online orientation was as powerful an analytic and reporting platform as it was an engaging, digital resource for students? You’d be able to clear a path to registration while generating meaningful data about the experience. Join Paola Moneymaker, Executive Director of Student and Academic Services, for an open discussion about how Eastern Florida State College improved its online orientation to increase registrations by 36% over the year before. She’ll talk about how leadership guided the development and sustainability of the project, as well as how technology is used for analysis and reporting to guide future decisions. This session features an open discussion and LIVE tour of the platform. You’ll be able to sample the orientation just like a student, including interactive elements and then look behind the scenes like an administrator to see what data is reported and how it’s being used. There will be time reserved for questions and answers.

 

Session 5-2: Using Data to Improve Retention at a Branch Campus

Keep Students on Path

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Presenters:
Elizabeth Gaskin, Provost, Martin County
Indian River State College
Charles Lunceford, Provost, Indian River County
Indian River State College

 

With a smaller staff and decentralized services, branch campuses often struggle to maintain consistency with college-wide student success initiatives to improve retention and completion. By collaborating across the College and using data points involving individual campus success rates, retention and completion rates, and student demographics, IRSC is changing the way branch campuses provide relevant and useful information to advisors and subsequently their students. This session will focus on how IRSC branch campuses use data to improve retention and completion, as well as those efforts at the branch campuses that help engage students and keep them moving forward on their Guided Pathways.

 

Session 5-3: The English Studio: Student Driven Support for ENC 1101

Ensure Students are Learning

Presentation Link

 

Presenters:
Elizabeth Barnes, Chair
Daytona State College
Dana Davidson, Academic Support Center Coordinator II
Daytona State College
Kristen Bales, Associate Director DSC-UCF Writing Center
Daytona State College

 

The Developmental Education Reform mandated by SB1720 (2013) gave Daytona State College Faculty and Academic Support staff the opportunity to collaborate on contextualized support opportunities that have helped maintain and even increase the success of our traditionally under-prepared students. One of our strategies is the English Studio (ENC0055L), a one-credit, weekly, guided lab made up of a facilitator and a group of 12 student peers, who are also enrolled in various sections of ENC1101: Introduction to Composition. Daytona State’s Studios are facilitated by Writing Specialists in the Writing Center and Academic Support Center as well as faculty volunteers, which means that Daytona State can adhere to the reform requirements using existing resources and without recreating the developmental education model of the past. Rising success rates in ENC1101 prove that the Studio has helped students successfully complete the gateway course without taking up to 16 hours of pre-gateway developmental education coursework. In addition, the inter-departmental cooperation associated with the Studio has increased the quality of academic support services as well as classroom instruction. The Studio provides ENC1101 instructors a way to connect their students with the additional help they need and Studio facilitators are connected to the day-to-day work of the students’ classroom experience.

 

Session 5-4: You Cannot Move the Needle Without Addressing Poverty: Building Systemic Support for Low-income Students

Keep Students on Path

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Presenter:
Dr. Russell Lowery-Hart, President
Amarillo College

 

In 2012, Amarillo College created its No Excuses Poverty Initiative. This initiative has designed a systemic approach to overcoming poverty barriers for our students. And our data shows, AC’s connected group of programs and projects are supporting students, boosting course completion, and increasing student retention rates. As educators, we enter higher education with a commitment to making a difference; however, our communities and country have demanded we now shoulder the responsibility of becoming poverty advocates. Poverty avocation was never in our training and not within the missions of our institutions. But, local, state, and national data indicates America is increasingly poorer and decreasingly educated. While academic supports are vitally important, poverty has become the greatest barrier to student success facing higher education. Through poverty training and intentionally connecting on-campus and off-campus community partnerships, higher education can do more than mitigate poverty, we can intentionally and systemically eradicate it.

 

Session 5-5: BI in a Cloud: The Next Generation of PulseBI

Keep Students on Path

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Presenters:
Zoran Stanisic, Senior Director, Enterprise Systems
St. Petersburg College
Dr. Jesse Coraggio, Vice President, Institutional Effectiveness and Academic Services
St. Petersburg College
Dustin Ryan, Solution Architect
Microsoft

 

The session will provide attendees a glimpse of the future of business intelligence for educational institutions. It will provide a demonstration of the recently developed Pulse BI proof of concept that includes the use of Microsoft’s Azure, cloud-based services, and Microsoft’s Power BI, a mobile enhanced user interface tool. Participants will be provide a demonstration of next generation of St. Petersburg College’s Pulse BI system which leverages the use of cloud-based computing without a requirement for a college-hosted systems. This powerful system will provide colleges a cost-effective BI solution that can support ‘real-time’ data-informed decision-making.